17 09, 2018

Good Sources for Indie Devs

By |2018-09-17T16:15:31+00:00September 17th, 2018|Uncategorized|0 Comments

This is simply a collection of nice sources for people who develop games. We have used, or plan to use, all of them. If you have any feedback, or things that should be added, feel free to contact us on for example Twitter or just in the comment section below. PR/Marketing http://www.indiegamegirl.com/ - A marketing consultant, aimed at indie devs. She has a lot of good info available in the web site as well. For example this post about sending reminders: http://www.indiegamegirl.com/press-meeting-reminder-quick-tip/ and this video example of her giving a speech: http://www.indiegamegirl.com/marketing-speaker/ I learnt some good stuff! Lots of gold nuggets in [...]

24 04, 2018

Joining the Sting Incubator

By |2018-04-24T16:00:38+00:00April 24th, 2018|Uncategorized|0 Comments

We have been talking with the friendly folks over at Sting for some time, and after talking with other game studios they are working with, we decided they would be a good fit for us. They liked us too, so we joined forces! The startup magazine Breakit wrote a short blurb on the joining companies here: article. What is Sting? Sting is an incubator in Stockholm, Sweden that helps start-ups in a lot of different industries. Now, what can they help us with? It's not going to be the making of the game, but there are a LOT of things surrounding [...]

24 11, 2017

Registering for Steam Direct – the Guide

By |2017-11-27T09:00:01+00:00November 24th, 2017|Uncategorized|1 Comment

Signing up for selling games via Steam is easier now than ever before. Before Greenlight, Steam had an internal vetting process. You could get (and did get) turned down if your game did not seem promising enough. With Greenlight, you had to appeal to the public instead. Now with Steam Direct you can just give Steam info, pay the fee, and you are in. I just did that, and I found a few bits of the process somewhat confusing at first, so I thought I should share that with you, and maybe you can have an easier time. This is going [...]

23 03, 2017

The Convention Manual

By |2017-10-09T14:43:46+00:00March 23rd, 2017|Uncategorized|0 Comments

As an indie game developer, going to a game convention is a great way to meet your prospective audience, test the game with actual players, note their reaction, meet the press and socialize with fellow devs. I've been to some conventions before and loved it, but never with the task of manning a booth, and never with my own studio. In preparation for that, I decided to write a guide. The guide turned out fairly comprehensive, so I decided to share it with you. Before Book everything you can, as early as you can. First off the tickets and or [...]

1 11, 2016

Hashtable Implementation Using Cuckoo Hashing

By |2016-11-01T11:58:59+00:00November 1st, 2016|Algorithms, C++|0 Comments

Background A hashtable is one of a select few datastructures that take the center spotlight when coding games. Other often encountered structures are vectors/dynamic arrays (of course), ring buffers and intrusive linked lists.  I will post about some of them in the future, but today is all about our hashtable implementation! In this post I will present Cuckoo hashing, which we use to implement our hashtable. Cuckoo hashing gets its name from the cuckoo family of birds, where many species lay eggs in other species nests. When a cuckoo chick hatches, it pushes other eggs/chicks out of the nest and gets all [...]

17 10, 2016

IT environment, part 3: Backup of services

By |2016-10-19T15:15:41+00:00October 17th, 2016|IT|0 Comments

In my previous blog posts (found here and here) I gave a brief introduction to containers and as well as giving tips on how to make the containers behave like physical computers on your LAN. I also briefly mentioned that we host our own git server. Why would we do that, when there are plenty of cloud services that offer us hassle-free access to git? In order to understand why we made this decision, one need to rewind the time a few months. After deciding to found our own studio, one of the first questions you need to answer is: do we spend time [...]

10 10, 2016

Jenkins in a RKT container

By |2016-10-17T12:13:57+00:00October 10th, 2016|IT, rkt|0 Comments

I've been writing my own Docker file to deploy a Jenkins container. Jenkins is a build system and we're using rkt (Rocket) to run the container. The official Dockerfile for Jenkins and most other examples where rather big, so I've been slimming ours down a bit. (If you are looking for something a bit more comprehensive, take a look at this really great tutorial over at Riot Games.) I'll probably add more settings as we figure out what could be better, but this is the state of it right now. Let me show you and explain bit by bit. [crayon-5baafbe981c5e364433725/] This part above states [...]

3 10, 2016

IT environment, part 2: Practical server setup

By |2016-10-17T12:13:57+00:00October 3rd, 2016|IT, rkt|0 Comments

In my first blog post I gave a very brief introduction to containerization and why we chose to spend some time on our initial IT setup. In this post, I will talk about how we've deployed our first container host server. If you're used to deploying myriads of servers on your own and can configure network settings in your sleep, this post might be a bit basic to you. However, if you're like me, with some technical know-how but rather inexperienced with larger network setups - then hopefully this post can help you if you one day decide to deploy your own container host. First, a brief [...]